Celebrating Leadership: Watch Pioneer’s video tribute to Stephen D. Fantone, former Board Chair

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Many of you know that Pioneer Institute has recently announced a leadership transition regarding its Board of Directors. Stephen D. Fantone, who has served as Board Chair since 2012, has stepped down and passed the torch to Adam Portnoy, who will guide the Institute as it embarks on a new strategic plan, Pioneer2024. As we look forward to our future, we also reflect on our successes, and acknowledge the deep commitment and stewardship that Stephen has shown this organization for almost a decade as Chair and, for many years prior to that, as a Board member and supporter. Stephen will continue to be involved with Pioneer in a new capacity – stay tuned for more information!

We are proud to present a video tribute, below, in which we share with our community Stephen’s reflections on his involvement with Pioneer, along with heartfelt appreciation from an array of Pioneer Board directors and staff members. We hope you enjoy it!

Click on the image below to watch the video:

From all of us at Pioneer, and on behalf of our many supporters, thank you, Stephen, for your extraordinary commitment to this organization!

Learn about membership and giving opportunities with Pioneer!

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