The Promise and Challenges of Rare Cancer Treatments

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Dr. William Smith, Pioneer Institute’s Visiting Fellow in Life Sciences, spoke about the challenges and opportunities for rare cancer treatments, and concerns about cost effectiveness tools such as the Quality Adjusted Life Year (QALY), in a video interview produced by Rare Cancers, a patient group based in Australia, for the November 26th Can Forum.

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The Promise and Challenges of Rare Cancer Treatments

Dr. William Smith, Pioneer Institute's Visiting Fellow in Life Sciences, spoke about the challenges and opportunities for rare cancer treatments, in a video interview produced by Rare Cancers, a patient group based in Australia, for the November 26th CAN Forum. 

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