David Dyssegaard Kallick on the Facts about Immigration

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This week on JobMakers, Host Denzil Mohammed talks with David Dyssegaard Kallick, Deputy Director of the nonprofit, nonpartisan think tank Fiscal Policy Institute and Assistant Visiting Professor at the Pratt Institute, on the impact of immigrants in local and national settings. And what he’s found should come as no surprise: immigrants and refugees are a net benefit to the U.S. and always have been. In fact, we owe a lot to immigration for revitalizing metro U.S. after population loss and economic decline since the 1960s, enriching our culture and cuisine, making our communities safer, creating jobs and businesses, and giving us a competitive edge when it comes to innovation, as you’ll find out in this week’s JobMakers podcast.

Guest:

David Dyssegaard Kallick is Assistant Visiting Professor at the Graduate Center for Planning and the Environment, where he teaches Urban Economics. Kallick is also Deputy Director of the Fiscal Policy Institute, a nonprofit, nonpartisan research and education organization that examines New York State economic and budget issues, and he is Director of FPI’s Immigration Research Initiative, which looks at immigration in New York and around the country. Kallick has worked and written about the rebuilding of New York after 9/11, Social Security, globalization, and European economic and social policies—particularly those of Denmark. He was for eight years editor of Social Policy magazine.

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