The Chancellor at this University Makes about 18.5 Times what an Average Employee at this Same University Makes… 

Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on
LinkedIn
+

According to MassOpenBooks, the average annual pay for UMass Medical School Employees is $57,746. But as highlighted in the chart below, Medical School Chancellor Michael Collins makes $1,069,752.  According to USA Today, the income that qualifies a Massachusetts resident to be included in the top 1% is $582,774. 

When looking at MassOpenBooks 2018 Highest Paid Employees under Higher Education, four out of the six highest-paid employees earning more than $582,774 annually are all from UMass Medical School.

TITLE NAME BASE PAY OTHER PAY TOTAL PAY
Chancellor and SVP Health Services Michael Collins $742,777 $326,975 $1,069,752
Executive Deputy Chancellor Provost and Dean Terence Flotte $722,495 $224,042 $946,537
Executive VP Innovation and Bus Development  James Glasheen  $477,327 $193,941 $671,268
Executive Vice Chancellor, UMBC Mark Klempner  $512,956 $127,307 $640,263
$2,455,555 $872,265 $3,327,820

SOURCE: MassOpenBooks

A public records request submitted three weeks ago regarding what other pay is for all four of these employees has not been answered. 

This isn’t just happening at the medical school campus in Worcester. US News states that in fall 2017, there were 1,626 public colleges and 1,687 private colleges, for a total of 3,313. According to the Chronicle of Higher Education, employees at 61 private college executives and 12 public college executives made $1 million or more from 2016-2017, less than 2 percent of the more than 3,000 schools.  

 According to a MarketWatch entitled A Dozen Public-College Presidents are Paid Over $1 Million, but do Taxpayers See the Benefit? “There’s no evidence that paying a public-school president more results in increased revenue for the school either in the form of a boost in state appropriations to the college or a jump in dollars raised from private sources…” 

Could the funds be better spent on education and instruction? 

US News ranks UMass Worcester as 15th best medical school in primary care and 45th best in research. That ranking makes UMass Worcester as the best primary care school in New England, but is it the high salary of the chancellor that got them there?  Statistics from UMass School of Medicine’s class of 2022 profile reported that out of a class of 162 students, only 24, or 15%, were economically and/or educationally disadvantaged. 

Here’s an idea: Why not slow down the growth rate of top salaries and instead spend more on financial aid so more low-income students get a shot at such a rewarding profession?

Paige Anderson is a Government Transparency Intern at The Pioneer Institute. She is a rising senior at Wellesley College majoring in Economics.

Get our higher education updates!

Read more of Pioneer’s related research & commentary:

Massachusetts is in the middle of a budget crisis. So why is it still subsidizing out-of-state horse owners?

/
In 2021, the Massachusetts legislature will consider raising…

Survey: Consumers Want Healthcare Price Information, But Few Realize It’s Available

Great strides have been made to increase healthcare price transparency through online cost estimator tools and a state law that requires providers to give out price information. Yet despite the eagerness of consumers to access prices and out-of-pocket costs, many are unaware that such information is available and don’t know how to access it, according to survey results published by Pioneer Institute.

Clearing Boston’s Throat: What the I-90 Allston Project Portends for Metro West Commuters

/
Join hosts Joe Selvaggi and Pioneer Institute’s Mary Connaughton, and guest, former Mass. Secretary of Transportation Jim Aloisi, as they discuss the I90 Allston Multimodal Project, its long-term benefits, and their concerns for the metro west commuters and communities during the project’s decade-long construction.

In light of COVID-19, Massachusetts should rethink its convention center bureaucracy

/
Right before commercial real estate values in the U.S. started…

COVID-19 Transparency – A Step Backwards

/
Massachusetts has unfortunately taken the backwards step of ending its longstanding daily reporting of something basic and important: the virus’s cumulative impact on various age groups.

Study: Shift from Highest-Priced Healthcare Providers Would Generate Tremendous Savings

Consumers in just one Massachusetts county could have saved nearly $22 million in a single year and $116.6 million adjusted for inflation over four years if they switched from using the most expensive providers for 16 shoppable healthcare services to those whose prices were closer to average, according to a new study published by Pioneer Institute.

Student Loan Collective Bargaining: Leveraging Loan Aggregation for Better Rates

/
Join Hubwonk host Joe Selvaggi as he talks with Chris Abkarians and Nikhil Argawal, co-founders of LeverEdge, about how their new student loan platform uses loan aggregation and competition to secure better rates for student loans.

HHS COVID Funding Tracker

As of July, the Feds have distributed $86.7 billion to medical providers, of which $2.3 billion came to Massachusetts. Pioneer’s new HHS COVID-19 Funding app shows who and how much, from the $1 sent to American Current Care of Massachusetts, to the $418,034,675 sent to the MA Department of Public Health. We also break down the distribution by city or town.

One UMass System, Different Reopening Plans

/
One UMass System, Different Reopening Plans On March 11, UMass…

Open Letter: COVID-19 Study and Recommendations Task Force Established Pursuant to Massachusetts Bill H.4672

Pioneer hopes the members of this important task force will be appointed as soon as possible and that they will look into recommendations to address Covid-19 among the aged and in the state’s nursing homes. Read our Open Letter.

New Pioneer Institute Hotline Allows Public to Report Violations of Open Meeting Law

/
With most public meetings taking place remotely as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, Pioneer Institute has unveiled an online hotline that allows members of the public to report potential violations of the Commonwealth’s and other states' Open Meeting Law.

Pioneer Institute Looks Ahead to the Protection of Civil Liberties

Challenges to Americans’ civil liberties have increased in recent years.  History teaches us that during national emergencies governments are even more likely to overstep and violate constitutionally guaranteed freedoms. To address this concern, Pioneer Institute has created “Respect My Rights,” a web-based hotline to which citizens can submit complaints and descriptions of violations they have experienced.

As college students and parents demand robust COVID-19 response, university finances suffer

/
COVID-19 is likely going to put severe pressure on college finances in the coming months due to costly added safety measures, cuts to state funding, and foregone revenue from campus housing, services, and events.

National Study Finds Most States Lack Healthcare Price Transparency Laws

At a time when the coronavirus pandemic has caused massive shifts in state policies on telehealth and scope of practice in healthcare, a new Pioneer Institute study underscores that most of the 50 states continue to suffer from weak laws regarding price transparency.  The study identified states that have laws that require carriers, providers or both to provide personalized cost information to consumers before obtaining healthcare services.  Fully 33 states placed in the lowest of the three broad analytic tiers on the strength of their state healthcare transparency laws. 

Mapping COVID-19 in Massachusetts Cities & Towns

/
Kudos to he Massachusetts Department of Public Health for posting the count and rate (per 100,000) of confirmed COVID-19 Cases in Massachusetts by City/Town.

Transparency Needed at Long-term Care Facilities

/
The anxiety of having a parent in a nursing home under the constant…

Financial Disclosures - As Important Now as Ever

/
News sources report that certain senators sold stocks just before the market crashed when the economic impact of Coronavirus came to light. Now more than ever, financial disclosures must be accessible to the media and to the public.

Sunshine Week 2020 – When Government Transparency Is More Important Than Ever

/
COVID-19 has overshadowed what was supposed to be Sunshine Week, but vigilance on behalf of open government is even more crucial during times like these, when the public has limited access. But government transparency is important at all times. Each year during Sunshine Week, Pioneer reviews some of its recent work to increase public accountability in Massachusetts government.