Step it up, UMASS

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You’ve come a long way, baby! Or maybe not.

It’s been 42 years since President Richard Nixon signed Title IX into law. While the legislation was enacted to ban gender discrimination in educational programs, over time it became a game changer for school-based athletic programs.

School girls and young college women seized the opportunity to abandon the sidelines and join the game like never before. According to the Women’s Sports Foundation, in 1972 only 1 in 27 girls participated in high school sports compared to 2 out of 5 today. Female participation in college sports also grew markedly, increasing by 500%.

Athletic excellence became a core value for women across the country. In 1972, the top female runner completed the Boston Marathon at a pace of 3 hours and 10 minutes, 54 minutes behind the top male. By 2013, the top female closed the gap to just 16 minutes.

Women now excel in traditional men’s sports like hockey and soccer, and girls aren’t waiting until middle or high school to take up a sport. Many begin soccer programs by kindergarten and don hockey skates by age four. ESPN referred to a study that showed 47% of girls participating in team sports by age six.

Those playing traditional female sports like softball and field hockey do so with a much greater intensity – and with high-quality uniforms, just like the boys.

Given such advances, we wanted to take a look at the salary gaps between state university coaches of sports played by both men and women. Using Pioneer’s transparency tool MassOpenBooks.org, here’s what we found:

Year Employee Name Department Job Title Earnings
2013 Cannella, Gregory J UMASS Amherst Athletic Coach Men’s Lacrosse

$121,241

2013 McMahon, Angela Anne UMASS Amherst Athletic Coach Women’s Lacrosse

$99,631

Higher (lower)

$21,610

% higher (lower)

22%

2012 Koch, Samuel C UMASS Amherst Athletic Coach Men’s Soccer

$93,631

2012 Matz, Ed UMASS Amherst Athletic Coach Women’s Soccer

$95,253

Higher (lower)

($1,622)

% higher (lower)

-2%

2013 Yarworth, Russell W UMASS Amherst Athletic Coach Men’s Swim & Diving

$113,316

2013 Newcomb, Robert S. UMASS Amherst Athletic Coach Women’s Swim & Diving

$83,793

Higher (lower)

$29,524

% higher (lower)

35%

2013 Kellogg, Derek W UMASS Amherst Head Coach Men’s Basketball

$719,664

2013 Dawley, Sharon M UMASS Amherst Head Coach Women’s Basketball

$234,493

Higher (lower)

$485,171

% higher (lower)

207%

2013 Duquette, Patrick UMASS Lowell Head Coach – Men’s Basketball*

$172,975

2013 McGahan, Sarah UMASS Lowell Head Coach – Women’s Basketball

$91,613

Higher (lower)

$81,362

% higher (lower)

89%

2013 Obrien, Kenneth L. UMASS Amherst Head Coach Men’s Track

$119,184

2013 Lafreniere, Julia A UMASS Amherst Head Coach Women’s Track

$91,730

Higher (lower)

$27,454

% higher (lower)

30%

2013 Figueroa, Christian UMASS Lowell Head Coach – Men’s Soccer

$50,291

2013 Monteiro, Elie T UMASS Lowell Head Coach – Women’s Soccer

$65,884

Higher (lower)

($15,593)

% higher (lower)

-24%

2013 Belisle, Peter M. UMASS Boston Head Coach Men’s Hockey

$63,647

2013 Harris, Colleen Marie UMASS Boston Head Coach Women’s Ice Hockey

$55,831

Higher (lower)

$7,816

% higher (lower)

14%

2014 Beverlin, Jake UMASS Boston Head Coach Men’s Soccer

$46,805

2014 Zombeck, Amy L UMASS Boston Head Coach Women’s Soccer

$61,022

Higher (lower)

($14,217)

% higher (lower)

-23%

*Annual rate (started in May 2013)

Of the nine sports teams we looked at within the UMASS system, coaches of the men’s teams earned more in six instances. In most cases, those earnings were substantially more than of those coaching women’s teams. Disparities were greatest at the flagship school, UMASS Amherst.

Coaches’ salaries reflect their program’s value to the school. While there may be sound reasons for the wage gap between coaches of men’s and women’s teams, the trend at UMASS implies a message that’s inconsistent with equal athletic opportunity.

Time to step it up!

1 reply
  1. Aaron
    Aaron says:

    Maybe that is because those men’s teams bring in more revenue for the university. In the cases where woman’s sports bring in more money those woman coaches make more. A good example of this was at my old college where the men’s basketball team stunk and the woman’s team would regularly go to the NCAA tournament. In this case I know for a fact that the coach made more money a year than the men’s coach because they brought in more revenue to the school, and boosters wanted to put more money into that program. Production equals profit in college athletics!

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